Blogs

  • Jun 202010

    The First Video

    Yesterday was the first class of the Mural citizen journalist project.

    We got to see the very basics of video.

    But one of our students, Cacau Ras, who already has a good experience in video producing, already produced a little teaser of the first lesson.

    If he's coming up with things like that by now, I wonder what he'll be doing next.

    Next week, we'll come up with some different video tasks for all the students to undergo.

    I'm looking forward to it.

  • Jun 202010

    First Day in Class

    I had hopes that, if not all, at least most of the students who assured me they'd be here on the first class would show up.

    Folha de São Paulo, the newspaper where I'm hosted, has 12 computers in the training room I was given access to. Unfortunately the larger room, with 14 machines, was being used by Folha's own trainees and was not available.

  • Jun 192010

    News Story Leads to Help for Dairy Industry

    I have for a while been aware of the ironic “equality” between Africa and America that the rate of food wastage on the two continents is about the same at 30 to 50 percent: In America it is spoilt in people’s refrigerators while in Africa it is spoilt on the way to the market.

    But this disturbing African reality hit me again hard in the face last month as we were gathering information about the Tanzania dairy industry ahead of the Milk Week at the end of May.

  • Jun 152010

    Content is king...

    Does it matter how we communicate or is WHAT we communicate of utmost importance?

    They (the techie-geeks and widget-wacks) talk about the internet being “in the clouds” but really the words and pictures we put online/out-there are as immoveable as stone. They will last. They will outlive us. People far-and-wide will read them. Societies will be affected by them… and they will make a difference.

    From words carved in stone to papyrus scrolls and then to moveable type, words and pictures have travelled and evolved.

  • Jun 152010

    Journey of a Thousand Miles

    Editors Note: The blog sums up what I will be expected to do in Malawi as outlined at the week-long orientation session at the ICFJ in Washington DC

    My journey to an Africa Development Journalism Fellowship in Malawi started with a significant first step in Washington.

  • Jun 142010

    Tears and Laughs at the Knight Fellows Orientation

    Six fellows are out on a quest to improve journalistic and media business quality. Kathie Klarreich shed tears during a session on Journalistic Ethics during the Knight Fellowship orientation in the American capital Washington.

    She remembered how some video journalists handled the victims of Haiti’s Earthquake transmitting their suffering live on TV while they could’ve helped evacuating those under debris.

  • Jun 142010

    Tears and Laughs at the Knight Fellows Orientation

    Kathie Klarreich shed tears during a session on Journalistic Ethics during the Knight Fellowship orientation in the American capital Washington.

    She remembered how some video journalists handled the victims of Haiti’s Earthquake transmitting their suffering live on TV while they could’ve helped evacuating those under debris.

    I asked Kathie who’s heading to Haiti later this year to help revive the country’s devastated media why she cried: "Life and Humanity always come first" she said:

    But the orientation was not all about tears.

  • Jun 132010

    Bon Voyage – Selamat Jalan – 一路顺风

    Six media professionals – three print, two video, one business – have tried to absorb over a week’s worth of training, counsel and advice before embarking for five very different efforts to expand the quality and the sustainability of journalism.  We are each Knight International Journalism Fellows, a program developed and managed by the International Committee for Journalists, through grants from Knight Foundation and the Gates Foundation.

  • Jun 132010

    Capital-ism

    The difference in Port-au-Prince and Washington DC is just a microcosm of what can, and needs, to be done in Haiti's post earthquake reconstruction. There is no comparison, really, between navigating Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince, and the orderly, manicured streets of DC.