Afghanistan

South and Central Asia Digital Media Co-Op

The deadline for applying to this program has passed.

In the spring of 2016 the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) implemented a program for South and Central Asia journalists that aimed to build bridges between South and Central Asia and U.S. media outlets. The opportunity exposed participating journalists to professional counterparts and practices in the United States and advance storytelling techniques rooted in social media, enabling journalists to produce work that engages youth in their countries.

Aug 132015

Former Scripps Howard Intern Named Deputy Spokesman to Afghan President

Former ICFJ Scripps Howard intern Sayed Zafar Hashemi has been named deputy spokesman for Afghan President Mohammad Ashraf Ghani, according to the office of the President.

Hashemi interned at the Scripps Howard Foundation Wire in 2007 and later worked at Voice of America as an editor and broadcaster.

The Scripps Howard Foundation Semester in Washington program provides two international students each year with the opportunity to work at the news service for a semester.

Roadblocks Along the New Silk Road

Journalists from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the Maldives were invited to apply to a program that aimed to connect 21-30 year old journalists in South Asia for joint reporting projects that explored topics relating to migration and issues affecting women and young people in the region, while also training the journalists on investigative journalism and responsible reporting in the digital age. The program, run by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, had two phases.

South Asia’s Youth at Risk – Multimedia Storytelling by Young Journalists

Participants in the 2012 "Best Practices in the Digital Age for South Asian Journalists" Program interview a farmer in Sri Lanka using an iPod Touch.

Journalists from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the Maldives were invited to apply to a program that aims to connect 21-30 year old journalists in South Asia for joint reporting projects that explore topics relating to youth and the risks young people face in the region, while also training the journalists on responsible reporting in the digital age. The program, run by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S.