Nepal

Covering Road Safety in the Southeast Asia Region

Meet the Fellows

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), road-traffic injuries account for approximately 316,000 death each year in the Southeast Asia Region. Globally, these deaths make up 25% of all road-traffic fatalities.

Photo courtesy of Yann, Wikimedia Commons

In partnership with WHO, the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) will organize a two-day workshop from Dec. 5 – 6, 2016, for journalists from the Southeast Asia region to improve their coverage of this public-health and -safety issue.

South and Central Asia Digital Media Co-Op

The deadline for applying to this program has passed.

In the spring of 2016 the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) implemented a program for South and Central Asia journalists that aimed to build bridges between South and Central Asia and U.S. media outlets. The opportunity exposed participating journalists to professional counterparts and practices in the United States and advance storytelling techniques rooted in social media, enabling journalists to produce work that engages youth in their countries.

Oct 292015

How an ICFJ Program Led to Quality Journalism and so Much More

For a pair of reporters, participating in a program with the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) didn’t just change the course of their careers. It altered the rest of their lives.

Jul 142015

The Promise and Perils of Drone Journalism

In January, CNN and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) reached an agreement to test the use of drones in reporting. This announcement came in the face of federal regulations banning the use of drones for commercial purposes. In the same month, Kenya banned civilian drone use.

From restrictive laws to societal stigma, drone journalists face many challenges in reporting with this innovative technology.

Roadblocks Along the New Silk Road

Journalists from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the Maldives were invited to apply to a program that aimed to connect 21-30 year old journalists in South Asia for joint reporting projects that explored topics relating to migration and issues affecting women and young people in the region, while also training the journalists on investigative journalism and responsible reporting in the digital age. The program, run by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, had two phases.

South Asia’s Youth at Risk – Multimedia Storytelling by Young Journalists

Participants in the 2012 "Best Practices in the Digital Age for South Asian Journalists" Program interview a farmer in Sri Lanka using an iPod Touch.

Journalists from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the Maldives were invited to apply to a program that aims to connect 21-30 year old journalists in South Asia for joint reporting projects that explore topics relating to youth and the risks young people face in the region, while also training the journalists on responsible reporting in the digital age. The program, run by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S.

New Media, New Challenges: Best Practices In the Digital Age

Journalists from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka were invited to apply to a training program aiming to connect journalists in the region on joint reporting projects that explored cross-border issues of importance, while also training them in responsible practices in the digital age. The program, ran by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S. State Department, had two main components.

Nepal: Journalism Training (1997)

Knight International Journalism Fellow Laird Anderson completed two months of journalism training in Nepal in 1997, partnering with the Nepal Press Institute.

Reporting Across Cultures: Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age

Journalists from across the Arab world, North America, Europe, Pakistan and Indonesia participated in an online training course entitled “Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age.” Select participants were chosen to participate in a conference in Alexandria, Egypt in February 2010 that focused on freedom of expression and reporting on Muslim-West relations.