Development

Can crime in Latin America be prevented?

Versión en español

Latin America and the Caribbean is the world´s most crime-ridden region. Its 2012 murder rate of nearly 24 per 100,000 citizens is amongst the world´s highest. One in five Latin Americans report having been victim of a robbery over the past year. The cost of crime varies from 2 percent of GDP to over 10 percent.

Pakistan: Driving citizen engagement and collaboration on open data

Knight International Journalism Fellow Rahma Muhammad Mian launched a series of flagship projects to spark data journalism and citizen engagement through open data in Pakistan. To foster a community of collaboration among journalists and technologists, she launched Hacks/Hackers Pakistan. She also held key events to kickstart data-driven projects, including Pakistan’s first data bootcamp in collaboration with the Center for Excellence in Journalism and Code for Africa.

The Iraqi-U.S. Journalism Exchange program took place on June, 2014. Five journalists from Iraq arrived to the U.S. without suspecting that the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) would throw their country into upheaval a day later. In this video, the journalists reflect on sectarianism and discrimination in their home country.

Aug 152014

ICFJ’s Butler Cited in Latest CIMA Report

A report released this month by the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA) touts the recent technological advancements of programs run by ICFJ and other global journalism organizations.

ICFJ’s Vice President of Programs Patrick Butler is cited in CIMA’s report, titled “Journalism Training in the Digital Era: Views From the Field.” The report, produced by veteran journalist and media trainer [Bill Ristow](h

Jul 152014

Journalists and Civil Society Must Join Forces to Engage the Public With Health News

Now that news reporting is no longer simply a matter of journalists deciding what they think the public needs to know, the mainstream media must make the shift from just reporting about news events to exploring ideas that move the audience to think and act.

Nowhere is that more true than in health coverage, where locally relevant engagement with the news can help individuals and communities identify their health priorities and have a conversation, offline and online, about solutions that can make a difference in their lives.

Jul 142014

Of Course We Drive Cars in Pakistan

Last month, 19 journalists from Pakistan returned home after completing three-week fellowships in newsrooms across the United States, bringing the total number of Pakistani journalists to participate in the U.S.-Pakistan Professional Partnership in Journalism to over 140.

From Topeka to Tallahassee, the fellows shadowed reporters and anchors, produced stories for their host media organizations, and experienced American culture at its core - in U.S. communities.

Jul 32014

ICFJ Participant Wins National Edward R. Murrow Award for Report on Human Trafficking

For his investigation into the sex trade along the United States’ Eastern seaboard, ICFJ Reporting Fellow Phillip Martin and the WGBH News team won a national Edward R. Murrow Award for excellence in electronic journalism.

Featuring interviews with victims detailing their experiences and state officials describing their efforts to prevent the practices, “Underground Trade: From Boston to Bangkok” uncovers the workings of East Coast-based human trafficking networks and their connections to Southeast Asia.

Jul 32014

A Nightmare Turned Beautiful

Most of us have been through travel nightmares that over time have turned into fond memories. Maybe you were lost for hours while in a place where nobody spoke your language, but you ended up making great friends and learned how to live alone. This is what happened with me.

Jun 202014

ICFJ Fellow Finds Ann Arbor "Not Far from Home"

Earlier this month, the tenth group of Pakistani journalists arrived in the United States as a part of ICFJ’s U.S.-Pakistan Professional Partnership in Journalism. Since its inception in 2011, the program has brought 146 Pakistani journalists to the U.S. for three-week fellowships in newsrooms across the country.

Throughout the journalists’ time in the U.S., they not only learn how American media operate.