Health/Science

Dec 22014

“Hala Nigeria” Helps African Journalists Track Ebola Outbreak

“Hala Nigeria,” a program of ICFJ’s Knight International Journalism Fellowships, is helping Nigerian journalists do a better job of tracking the deadly Ebola virus. As a Knight Innovation Fellow in Nigeria, I am helping Vivienne Irikefe of Television Continental (TVC) to show how the virus is spreading across West Africa.

Irikefe won the story contest as part of the Hala Nigeria program (which means “Speak out, Nigeria” in pidgin English). The program is designed to spur better coverage of vital health issues and increase audience engagement in those stories.

Oct 282014

ICFJ’s Ben Colmery participates in panel on data journalism for the developing world

Data journalism is having a powerful impact on the lives of citizens, especially in the developing world, according to a panel of media-development experts brought together on October 15 by the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA).

The discussion titled “How Data Journalism Drives Results in Developing Countries” touched on data initiatives around the world, with a focus on projects in Africa and Latin America.

Coding for Latin America: Using new technology to improve lives

Knight International Journalism Fellow Juan Manuel Casanueva is creating a citizen engagement lab in Mexico and Central America to support data-driven media projects.

Sep 242014

Science writer urges health reporters not to overlook the role of fathers

NEW YORK –Science journalist and author Paul Raeburn said that many health initiatives focus narrowly on mothers and children, forsaking the important role fathers play.

As the keynote speaker at ICFJ’s Global Health Reporting Awards dinner on Sept. 22, Raeburn, author of “Do Fathers Matter,” urged health and science journalists to explore how fathers can also insure the health and wellbeing of families.

Sep 112014

Journalists from BRIC Countries Win ICFJ Health Reporting Contest

Four reporters from BRIC nations (Brazil, Russia, India and China) won ICFJ’s 2014 Global Health Reporting Contest for outstanding coverage of maternal and child health issues. The journalists work for news organizations that reach a combined audience of more than 11.5 million.

The winners will be recognized for their reporting at an Awards Dinner on Sept. 22 at The New York Times Headquarters.

Jul 152014

Journalists and Civil Society Must Join Forces to Engage the Public With Health News

Now that news reporting is no longer simply a matter of journalists deciding what they think the public needs to know, the mainstream media must make the shift from just reporting about news events to exploring ideas that move the audience to think and act.

Nowhere is that more true than in health coverage, where locally relevant engagement with the news can help individuals and communities identify their health priorities and have a conversation, offline and online, about solutions that can make a difference in their lives.

Apr 222014

Using Drone Journalism to Cover the News in Remote Areas of Africa

Kenyan digital journalist Dickens Onditi Olewe wants to help journalists across Africa improve their coverage from hard-to-reach places by giving them an “eye in the sky” aerial view.

But instead of expensive helicopters, he’s interested in low-cost drone technology, which he says has the potential to revolutionize media access to frontline events and stories in remote areas.

Global Health Reporting Contest

A mother holds her newborn child in a hospital in Odisha, one of India's poorest states.

This program is no longer active. To apply for the 2015 Global Health Reporting Contest, click here.

Journalists in Brazil, China, India and Russia won a trip to the United States and cash prizes as part of four regional competitions to recognize the best media coverage of maternal and child health.

maternal and child health reporting contest program page photo

A doctor in India conducts a routine checkup with an expectant mother. Photo: Lifespring Hospitals

Mar 272014

News Contest Launched to Engage Citizens on Health

Nigerian journalists and media organizations can win cash, mentoring and in-house technical assistance through a new story competition aimed at amplifying citizen voices on vital health issues.

Winners of the Hala Nigeria Story Challenge will receive prizes up to $1,000 and a chance to attend an exclusive EditorsLab with a faculty of international experts.