Health/Science

Back In The Newsroom Fellowship 2014

The Back In the Newsroom Fellowship will help journalism educators see firsthand the new skills needed for students to succeed in today’s newsrooms.

Back In The Newsroom is a fellowship program that brings five professors from historically black colleges and universities to spend a summer working in digitally advanced U.S. news organizations. This “internship” will help journalism educators see firsthand the new skills needed for students to succeed in today’s newsrooms.

The fellows will update their digital skills, develop cutting-edge curricula and strengthen relations between these newsrooms and their schools. The program will help improve diversity at leading U.S.

Feb 182014

Geographic Data Powers Climate Change Coverage in Indonesia

Frequent flooding and critically low crop yields are just two of the warning signs of climate change in Indonesia, home to the world’s third-largest tropical rainforest and some of the highest levels of biological diversity on the globe.

To shed light on these crucial issues, data journalists have launched the news site Ekuatorial, which offers the latest environmental news and engaging, easy-to-understand interactive maps of oceans, forests and natural disasters in Indonesia.

Community Health Reporting Fellowship

We are no longer accepting applications for this fellowship.

Overcoming barriers to care in underserved communities is one of the major challenges facing the United States health care system today. Journalists can play an essential role in leveling the playing field by covering the critical health issues that most affect these communities.

The Community Health Reporting Fellowship gives U.S.

Feb 62014

To Cover Health Effectively, Journalists Must Look at the Big Picture

When a new health initiative is announced, journalists too often think they have an easy story to tell. They can quote officials on what the project will do and how quickly they expect it to eradicate a disease or improve the health of the people.

But if reporters think they are telling the whole story, they need to think again. These initiatives do not exist in isolation. Placing the new plan in context, and especially explaining where it fits within the overall health system, is critical to informing the public.

Nigeria: Increasing Citizen Engagement With Health News

Babatunde Akpeji is expanding his vibrant citizen journalist network in the Niger Delta.

“Hala Nigeria: Many Voices, Better Lives,” an unprecedented project that brings together five Knight International Journalism Fellows to pool their expertise, will increase public engagement and amplify citizen voices in health news in Africa’s most populous country.

The project, which means “Speak Out, Nigeria,” is using new digital tools to spur citizen engagement and promote data-driven reporting to take advantage of Nigeria’s new open data movement.

Nov 122013

New Website Helps Reporters Cover Health in Africa

These African women are holding bed nets, which will help protect their families from mosquitoes carrying malaria. Photo: Gates Foundation

The site, which features learning resources, health reporting best practices and a vibrant network of more than 200 journalists and experts, launched during the recent 2013 African Media Leaders Forum in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

International Family Planning Reporting Fellowship

U.S. journalists can win a reporting fellowship to attend the International Family Planning Conference in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on November 12-15. The journalists will spend six days meeting leading family planning experts from around the world, attending formal sessions of the conference and participating in site visits to clinics and schools to learn about family planning education, tools and services and hear from women themselves about what they want and need.

Aug 142013

Citizen Journalism Gives the People of the Niger Delta a Voice

Somewhere far from the capital city, far from most newsrooms, and, for that matter, most news consumers, a dilapidated hospital stops functioning. Maybe it happened because the faltering power system failed, or maybe the unpaid staff members finally quit. Either way, the result is the same: people in a remote place just lost their access to healthcare.

In the city, people start noticing when the lines at the local health facility grow longer with people from the countryside who have come because they have nowhere to go for treatment back home.