ICFJ Programs in Print

  • Bringing Home the World: International Reporting Fellowship Program for Minority Journalists

    The Bringing Home the World Fellowship helps U.S.-based minority journalists cover compelling yet under-reported international stories, increasing the diversity of voices in global news. The program helps level the playing field and redress the inequality minority journalists often face by giving them the opportunity to report from overseas and advance their careers.

    In previous years, fellows have produced more than 174 stories, enriching their communities with new perspectives on global issues.

  • Call for Entries: The Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) in collaboration with ONE and the Elliott family seek entries for the inaugural 2017 Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling. Mike served as a distinguished editor at The Economist, Newsweek and Time before becoming CEO of ONE. Earlier this year, he had spoken of his dream to establish an award that would bring together his belief in great journalism with his commitment to progress in Africa.

  • Covering Road Safety in the Southeast Asia Region

    Meet the Fellows

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), road-traffic injuries account for approximately 316,000 death each year in the Southeast Asia Region. Globally, these deaths make up 25% of all road-traffic fatalities.

    Photo courtesy of Yann, Wikimedia Commons

    In partnership with WHO, the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) will organize a two-day workshop from Dec. 5 – 6, 2016, for journalists from the Southeast Asia region to improve their coverage of this public-health and -safety issue.

  • Story contest winners highlight minority women entrepreneurs in the U.S.

    Minority women entrepreneurs are on the rise, and it’s about time. Women-owned businesses increased by 27% and minority-owned businesses increased by 38% between 2007 and 2012, according to 2012 U.S. Census Data.

  • Russia-U.S. Young Media Professionals Program

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) invites young, English-speaking journalists from Russia’s regions to take part in the “Russia-U.S. Young Media Professionals Program.” Eleven journalists, who will be selected in competition, will come to the United States for a program from Feb. 9 to 27, 2015.

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) invites early-career, English-speaking journalists from Russia’s regions to take part in the “Russia-U.S.

  • Vietnam-U.S. Reporting Program: Marking Two Decades of U.S.-Vietnamese Relations

    Trung tâm báo chí quốc tế (ICFJ) đang tìm kiếm các ứng viên cho Chương trình Đưa tin Việt Nam - Hoa Kỳ. Chương trình này có một khóa học trực tuyến, tua tham quan học tập và tư vấn cá nhân để kỷ niệm 20 năm thiết lập quan hệ ngoại giao giữa Hoa Kỳ và Việt Nam.

    60 nhà báo Việt Nam đủ điều kiện sẽ được ICFJ lựa chọn để tham gia chương trình. Khóa học trực tuyến sẽ được tổ chức trong năm tuần, bắt đầu từ ngày 05 tháng Một năm 2015 và kết thúc vào ngày 06 tháng Hai năm 2015. Khóa học sẽ tập trung vào các vấn đề về song phương và toàn cầu.

  • Social Justice Reporting for a Global America: International Reporting Fellowship Program for U.S.-based Journalists

    This program is no longer active.

    About the Program

    Plagued by the twin challenges of a slow economy and digital disruption, many U.S. news organizations are cutting back on foreign coverage and are shrinking their editorial staffs.

    But journalists can play an essential role in raising awareness around international social justice issues, including women’s rights, corruption, human trafficking, poverty, religious tolerance, environmental issues, migration and education.

  • Social Justice Reporting for a Global America: International Reporting Fellowship Program for U.S.-based Journalists

    This program is no longer active.

    About the Program

    Plagued by the twin challenges of a slow economy and digital disruption, many U.S. news organizations are cutting back on foreign coverage and are shrinking their editorial staffs.

    But journalists can play an essential role in raising awareness around international social justice issues, including women’s rights, corruption, human trafficking, poverty, religious tolerance, environmental issues, migration and education.

  • Beyond the Border: Covering the Immigration Phenomenon through Digital Media

    The Scripps Howard Immigration reporting training program brings together journalists from the U.S. Spanish and English-language media for a week-long training on how to cover immigration issues using multimedia tools.

    ICFJ is currently seeking applicants for the 2012 Scripps immigration reporting program. The program is scheduled to take place Sunday July 15, 2012 through Sunday July 22, 2012 in Washington, D.C.

    The application deadline is Monday May 28, 2012.

    The 2012 program will have a special focus on the U.S. 2012 presidential election and immigration.

  • India: Enhance a Cutting-Edge, Multimedia Academy and Help Make it Sustainable

    Siddhartha Dubey is a Knight International Journalism Fellow who led the World Media Academy Delhi, the only journalism institute in India that teaches students to report across multiple platforms, with hand-on, practical training in print, TV, online video, audio/radio and social media.

  • McGraw-Hill Personal Finance Reporting Online Courses

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) has offered two online courses in English and Spanish on covering personal finance for Hispanic journalists and US journalists covering finance issues for minority and immigrant communities. These courses started on July 1 and will end on August 18.

    The courses were open to Spanish-speaking and English-speaking journalists from ethnic media.

  • Nigeria: Create New Health Section at Daily Trust newspaper

    As a Knight Health Journalism Fellow, Sunday Dare created an eight-page weekly health section at Daily Trust, the most widely read newspaper in northern Nigeria.

    Working with a team of dedicated health reporters, he increased health coverage at the newspaper from an average of eight stories per month to 27, with in-depth and investigative stories on issues such as AIDS, cancer, cholera, polio, public health facilities, and Lassa fever, a fatal disease carried by rats.

  • Middle East: Start Up Investigative Reporting Teams at Major News Outlets

    At a pivotal time for the Middle East, Knight International Journalism Fellow Amr El-Kahky is launching teams of investigative reporters at news organizations across the region. His efforts have helped journalists gain more access to government documents than ever before, particularly in Jordan and the West Bank. His investigative unit in Jordan uncovered a vote-buying scheme ahead of the November 2010 parliamentary elections. Jordanian reporters also tackled the issue of childhood alcohol addiction—a controversial topic never covered in the past.

  • Haiti: Track Aid Funds to Ensure a Strong Recovery

    Haitian journalists work in a makeshift newsroom at Le Nouvelliste. Their old building was destroyed in the January 2010 earthquake.

    Knight International Journalism Fellow Klarreich established an investigative team at Le Nouvelliste, Haiti’s leading newspaper, which regularly produces stories on the misuse of aid sent to Haiti after the catastrophic January 2010 earthquake. The team broke stories about a land dispute that stopped work at a critically important sanitation plant near a refugee camp. After reading these reports, Haitian President Michel Joseph Martelly intervened and construction resumed.

  • Zambia: Ramp up Health Coverage to Save Lives

    Zarina Geloo launched the country’s first weekly health page in the Times of Zambia, the country’s largest daily newspaper. She trained a team of a dozen reporters to cover issues such as AIDS prevention, malaria, measles and cancer.

    A front-page story on a measles epidemic led to a government vaccination campaign targeting 1.6 million people. A series on typhoid cases from contaminated drinking water in the capital triggered a government investigation and a new water treatment program.

  • Mozambique: Bring Rural Health Issues to National Attention

    Savana reporter Salane Muchanga (left), a trainee of Knight Fellow Sayagues, interviews a Maputo resident on health concerns.

    From her base at the weekly newspaper Savana in Maputo, Mozambique, Knight Health Journalism Fellow Mercedes Sayagues produced health coverage that transformed reporting at news organizations across the country.

  • Tanzania: Put the Spotlight on Rural Development

    Joachim Buwembo helped to create Kilimo Kwanza (Agriculture First), now a financially vibrant weekly publication focusing on agriculture issues. The eight-page supplement is published in English and Kiswahili by the Guardian Newspapers, the country’s top independent newspaper group.

    Since it began, the supplement has featured more than 200 stories. Some reports led to new bank loans for farmers to buy imported tractors that lay idle as well as to increased government investment in dairy equipment and irrigation.

  • Zambia: Putting Health News in the Headlines

    Knight International is working to make health reporting a regular beat at one of Zambia's leading newspapers. Knight Fellow Antigone Barton helped to establish the first health desk at the Zambia Daily Mail, one of the country's most influential newspapers. Under her coaching and mentoring, the staff markedly increased the quality and quantity of health stories on topics such as HIV/AIDS, drug-resistant tuberculosis, cholera and malaria. Barton’s fellowship ended in February 2010.

  • South Africa: Give Health News a Higher Profile

    Mia Malan launched the first weekly health program at Soweto TV, the largest community TV station in Africa, with more than 1 million viewers. She trained a team to produce high-quality feature reports for the show with a special focus on HIV/AIDS. The half-hour show features topics such as the use and abuse of antiretroviral drugs, male circumcision, attention-deficit disorder and organ transplants.

    In addition to the new half-hour weekly show, health stories on Soweto TV’s daily news reports have increased threefold as a result of Malan’s efforts.

  • Kenya: Promote Better Health Coverage, Better Policies

    The Kenya Alliance of Health and Science Reporters (KAHSR), a journalism association launched by Knight International Journalism Fellow Rachel Jones, now offers regular training workshops and resources on topics such as new vaccines, children’s health and agricultural research. The association is supported by a grant from the London-based Wellcome Trust. At Alliance workshops, journalists can interact with the country’s leading medical researchers and scientists.

  • Ghana: Promoting Free and Fair Election Coverage

    Knight International enabled journalists in Ghana to generate balanced reports on their country's 2008 presidential election. Knight Fellow Alison Bethel produced a first-of-its-kind election handbook that journalists used to focus on important issues and avoid stories that fuel partisan strife. The handbook was widely distributed to journalists throughout the capital.

  • Liberia: Bolstering Coverage of the Courts in Post-Conflict Era

    Marquita Smith is a Knight International Journalism Fellow who helped launch the Judicial Reporters Network in Liberia. Smith formed this association and trained its members to cover the country’s fledgling legal system. Inspired by Smith, Ora Garway, a journalist in the association, launched a newspaper called The Punch that focuses on legal reporting. Garway was the country’s first woman managing editor. Smith returned to Liberia in June 2010 to help Garway develop a business plan for the new newspaper and create a website featuring coverage of the justice system.

  • Pakistan: Upgrading the Quality of Broadcast News (2009)

    In a country where independent television is proliferating, Knight International worked with broadcast journalists at a leading network to make their reports more timely and compelling. By adding more stories from the field and reducing reliance on single sources, Fellow Adnan Adil Zaidi revitalized the newsroom at ARY OneWorld, now renamed ARY News.

  • Uganda: Setting a New Standard for Health Journalism in Africa

    Knight International has made huge inroads in health coverage in Uganda. In 2.5 years, Knight Fellow Christopher Conte developed a vibrant community of journalists who now have the expertise to tackle tough health issues including the AIDS epidemic and health-care spending.

  • Indonesia: Expand Environmental Coverage

    Knight International worked with newspapers and radio stations to create weekly environmental reports in Indonesia, a country facing deforestation, over-fishing, mining and pollution.