ICFJ Programs in Gender

  • Story contest winners highlight minority women entrepreneurs in the U.S.

    Minority women entrepreneurs are on the rise, and it’s about time. Women-owned businesses increased by 27% and minority-owned businesses increased by 38% between 2007 and 2012, according to 2012 U.S. Census Data.

  • Pakistan: Driving citizen engagement and collaboration on open data

    Knight International Journalism Fellow Rahma Muhammad Mian launched a series of flagship projects to spark data journalism and citizen engagement through open data in Pakistan. To foster a community of collaboration among journalists and technologists, she launched Hacks/Hackers Pakistan. She also held key events to kickstart data-driven projects, including Pakistan’s first data bootcamp in collaboration with the Center for Excellence in Journalism and Code for Africa.

  • The Center for Excellence in Journalism (CEJ)

    Professional journalists participate in a short TV documentary production module at the CEJ in Karachi.

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), along with Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and the Institute of Business Administration (IBA), have established the Center for Excellence in Journalism (CEJ) in Karachi, Pakistan. The CEJ serves as a hub for the professional development, training and networking of Pakistani journalists and media professionals from all parts of the country. It also welcomes journalists from around the world to participate in its programs.

  • The Henry Luce Foundation Program to Promote Excellence in Global Coverage of Religion

    Continuing its efforts to improve coverage of religion around the world, ICFJ has launched a two-year program for American and international journalists who cover religious issues. By improving professional skills and increasing the dialogue around religion, ICFJ hopes to encourage journalists to engage the subject more openly and free of bias, and simultaneously more respectfully and critically. The program activities will include two online courses and international joint reporting projects,

    The program is designed to:

    • Improve U.S.
  • Reporting Across Cultures: Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age

    Journalists from across the Arab world, North America, Europe, Pakistan and Indonesia participated in an online training course entitled “Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age.” Select participants were chosen to participate in a conference in Alexandria, Egypt in February 2010 that focused on freedom of expression and reporting on Muslim-West relations.

  • Bangladesh: Creating the First Women’s Broadcast News Agency

    In a country where women have played a minor role in TV news, Kawser Mahmud has created the country’s first women’s broadcast news agency. The agency is giving women the skills they need to fill key positions in broadcast news at Bangladesh’s 10 newly licensed TV stations—and to produce stories on issues that may be of interest to women viewers.

    Mahmud trained nearly three dozen women as reporters, producers and camera operators at the Television News Agency (TVNA). Most have been scooped up by the new independent TV stations.

  • Syria: New Online Network for Young Journalists

    In the Middle East, bloggers and digital journalists are covering stories and sparking debates on topics avoided by mainstream media. Knight International created an online networking site in Syria that enables young reporters to share resources, experiences. Called Tawasul – Arabic for "connecting" – the network features multimedia stories, including photography, cartoons and animation, on social issues. Their stories focus on social issues such as maternal and child health, gender equality and religious tolerance.

  • Rwanda: From Hate Radio to Responsible Reporting

    In a country where radio helped incite genocide, Knight International helped produce balanced broadcasts on the recovering nation. Knight Fellow Sputnik Kilambi improved newscasts in French and Kinyarwandan and launched the first news programs in English at the country's first privatized independent radio station, Contact FM.

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • Launched English-language news service that is used by government leaders and is attracting new sponsors.

    • Raised the station's profile: Before the U.S.

  • Back In The Newsroom Fellowship 2014

    The Back In the Newsroom Fellowship will help journalism educators see firsthand the new skills needed for students to succeed in today’s newsrooms.

    Back In The Newsroom is a fellowship program that brings five professors from historically black colleges and universities to spend a summer working in digitally advanced U.S. news organizations. This “internship” will help journalism educators see firsthand the new skills needed for students to succeed in today’s newsrooms.

    The fellows will update their digital skills, develop cutting-edge curricula and strengthen relations between these newsrooms and their schools. The program will help improve diversity at leading U.S.