ICFJ Programs in Social Issues

  • Press Freedom and Access to Information: A News Corp Fellowship for Mexican Journalists

    ICFJ will bring five Mexican journalists to Washington, D.C. and the News Corp headquarters in New York. The selected journalists, News Corp Fellows, will spend a month in the United States, interning at The Wall Street Journal and learning about freedom of the press and working in an American newsroom.

    Videographers, newsroom editors, bloggers, graphic reporters and journalists from all areas of expertise are welcome to apply.

    To complement the four week program at The Wall Street Journal, ICFJ will design an orientation program in Washington, D.C.

  • Bringing the World to an Indian News Audience

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), with the support from the U.S. Consulate General in Hyderabad, India, invites applications for the program “Bringing the World to an Indian News Audience,” offered to support media professionals in the dynamic locale of Hyderabad as they illustrate the impact of international issues on the daily lives of their local readership and India’s broader development objectives.

  • Community Health Reporting Fellowship

    Overcoming barriers to care in underserved communities is one of the major challenges facing the United States health care system today. Journalists can play an essential role in leveling the playing field by covering the critical health issues that most affect these communities.

    The Community Health Reporting Fellowship gives U.S.

  • Social Justice Reporting for a Global America: International Reporting Fellowship Program for U.S.-based Journalists

    The deadline to apply for the 2014 program has passed. All applicants will be notified of their status in April 2014.

    About the Program

    Plagued by the twin challenges of a slow economy and digital disruption, many U.S. news organizations are cutting back on foreign coverage and are shrinking their editorial staffs.

    But journalists can play an essential role in raising awareness around international social justice issues, including women’s rights, corruption, human trafficking, poverty, religious tolerance, environmental issues, migration and education.

  • Bringing Home the World: International Reporting Fellowship Program for Minority Journalists

    The deadline to apply for the 2014 program has passed. All applicants were notified of their status in April 2014.

    Over the years, journalists of color have had few opportunities to work as foreign correspondents. That’s especially the case in today’s media environment, with sharp cutbacks by many news outlets in their international coverage. At the same time, communities of color rarely receive coverage of global issues that directly affect their lives, from the migration of jobs overseas to wars fought by minorities serving in the U.S. military.

  • Social Justice Reporting for a Global America: International Reporting Fellowship Program for U.S.-based Journalists

    The deadline to apply for the 2014 program has passed. All applicants will be notified of their status in April 2014.

    About the Program

    Plagued by the twin challenges of a slow economy and digital disruption, many U.S. news organizations are cutting back on foreign coverage and are shrinking their editorial staffs.

    But journalists can play an essential role in raising awareness around international social justice issues, including women’s rights, corruption, human trafficking, poverty, religious tolerance, environmental issues, migration and education.

  • Bringing Home the World: International Reporting Fellowship Program for Minority Journalists

    The deadline to apply for the 2014 program has passed. All applicants were notified of their status in April 2014.

    Over the years, journalists of color have had few opportunities to work as foreign correspondents. That’s especially the case in today’s media environment, with sharp cutbacks by many news outlets in their international coverage. At the same time, communities of color rarely receive coverage of global issues that directly affect their lives, from the migration of jobs overseas to wars fought by minorities serving in the U.S. military.

  • Africa: Improving and Expanding Technology

    Knight International Journalism Fellow Friedrich Lindenberg works with journalists and watchdog organizations to develop data resources and investigative tools.

  • Nigeria: Increasing Citizen Engagement With Health News

    Babatunde Akpeji will expand his vibrant citizen journalist network in the Niger Delta.

    “Hala Nigeria: Many Voices, Better Lives,” an unprecedented project that brings together five Knight International Journalism Fellows to pool their expertise, will increase public engagement and amplify citizen voices in health news in Africa’s most populous country.

    The project, which means “Speak Out, Nigeria,” is using new digital tools to spur citizen engagement and promote data-driven reporting to take advantage of Nigeria’s new open data movement.

  • Beyond the Border: Covering the Immigration Phenomenon through Digital Media

    The Scripps Howard Immigration reporting training program brings together journalists from the U.S. Spanish and English-language media for a week-long training on how to cover immigration issues using multimedia tools.

    ICFJ is currently seeking applicants for the 2012 Scripps immigration reporting program. The program is scheduled to take place Sunday July 15, 2012 through Sunday July 22, 2012 in Washington, D.C.

    The application deadline is Monday May 28, 2012.

    The 2012 program will have a special focus on the U.S. 2012 presidential election and immigration.

  • The Henry Luce Foundation Program to Promote Excellence in Global Coverage of Religion

    Continuing its efforts to improve coverage of religion around the world, ICFJ has launched a two-year program for American and international journalists who cover religious issues. By improving professional skills and increasing the dialogue around religion, ICFJ hopes to encourage journalists to engage the subject more openly and free of bias, and simultaneously more respectfully and critically. The program activities will include two online courses and international joint reporting projects,

    The program is designed to:

    • Improve U.S.
  • Public Service Journalism for Arabic-speaking Journalists

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) held a six-week online course in Arabic on using digital tools in public service journalism and investigative techniques. The online course was the first part of a program that brought together journalists, citizen journalists and civil society actors from Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, West Bank/Gaza and Yemen. The six-week online course guided 60 participants from the above mentioned countries to work on ideas for multimedia public service journalism projects.

  • Unilever Journalism Exchange Program for Journalists from Ghana

    Samuel Kwaku Agyemang of Metropolitan Television (Metro TV) in Accra participated in the 2011 Unilever Journalism Exchange Program for journalists from Ghana. Agyemang was named the Best Journalist of the Year in Ghana in 2009.

  • Online Course on Digital Tools for Community Radio Journalists

    As part of the Escucha! Taking Community Radio Digital in the Americas program, ICFJ offered two online courses in Spanish to train community radio journalists from Latin America and from Hispanic media in the US.As part of the Escucha! Taking Community Radio Digital in the Americas program, ICFJ offered two online courses in Spanish to train community radio journalists from Latin America and from Hispanic media in the US.

  • Reporting Across Cultures: Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age

    Journalists from across the Arab world, North America, Europe, Pakistan and Indonesia participated in an online training course entitled “Freedom of Expression in the Digital Age.” Select participants were chosen to participate in a conference in Alexandria, Egypt in February 2010 that focused on freedom of expression and reporting on Muslim-West relations.

  • Seminar on Future Energy: Sustainable Energy for a Low-carbon World

    About the Conference

    The International Center for Journalists selected 13 participants to participate in a Seminar on Future Energy: Sustainable Energy for a Low-carbon World in Samsø Island, Denmark on December 11-13, 2009.

  • Early Childhood Development Conference in Senegal

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) administered a training focused on improving coverage on childhood development, the first of its kind. The Early Childhood Development (ECD) movement seeks to get more resources devoted to health and education of children in the critical early years from 0- 8.

  • World Affairs Journalism Fellowships

    The World Affairs Journalism Fellowships are intended for experienced journalists and editors from America's community-based media outlets. The goal is to give them an opportunity to establish the connections between local-regional issues and what is happening abroad.

  • Immigration Coverage: An Online Course for Journalists in the Americas

    As a continuation of ICFJ's Training Program on Coverage of Immigration, the center offered an online course on immigration coverage for journalists from Latin America and the U.S. Hispanic media.As a continuation of ICFJ's Training Program on Coverage of Immigration, the center offered an online course on immigration coverage for journalists from Latin America and the U.S. Hispanic media.

  • Mexico: Defend Free Expression

    Knight International helped launch a foundation to protect journalists and promote freedom of the press in a country where reporters are increasingly in danger. Knight Fellow Benjamín Fernández educated journalists on how to take advantage of freedom of information laws and counseled them on their own legal rights. Fernandez also created a group of media lawyers willing to defend journalists under threat.

  • Crisis Reporting: Deeper, Broader, Better

    ICFJ administered a five-week Arabic online course on crisis reporting. The course, which took place April 15 to May 20, 2008, explored various topics, including natural disasters, humanitarian interventions and health crises.

  • Lebanon: New TV Programs Focus on Social Problems in Middle East

    Working with teams of broadcast journalists from major news networks in Jordan and Lebanon, Knight International created "Arab House," a series of news documentaries. The shows focused on social issues such as access to clean water and good health care. Knight Fellow Mariam Sami helped these journalists identify compelling topics and produce in-depth reports that were widely broadcast.

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • Four half-hour documentaries on the arts, education, health and the environment aired on local and satellite TV around the world.
  • Covering Immigration: Establishing Links Between U.S. and Latin American Media

    This training program on coverage of immigration brought together journalists from U.S. community-based Spanish- and English-language media and Latin American media for a hands-on training workshop on covering immigration issues, followed by several days of reporting on the issue under the guidance of experienced trainers. It took place in Washington, D.C., April 16-24.

  • International Journalism Exchange

    For decades, the International Center for Journalists’ International Journalism Exchange has brought experienced newspaper, broadcast or online editors from the developing world to the U.S. to observe how media are managed here.

  • Back In The Newsroom Fellowship

    The Back In the Newsroom Fellowship will help journalism educators see firsthand the new skills needed for students to succeed in today’s newsrooms.

    Back In The Newsroom is a fellowship program that brings five professors from historically black colleges and universities to spend a summer working in digitally advanced U.S. news organizations. This “internship” will help journalism educators see firsthand the new skills needed for students to succeed in today’s newsrooms.

    The fellows will update their digital skills, develop cutting-edge curricula and strengthen relations between these newsrooms and their schools. The program will help improve diversity at leading U.S.