ICFJ Programs in Television/Video

  • Bringing Home the World: International Reporting Fellowship Program for Minority Journalists

    The Bringing Home the World Fellowship helps U.S.-based minority journalists cover compelling yet under-reported international stories, increasing the diversity of voices in global news. The program helps level the playing field and redress the inequality minority journalists often face by giving them the opportunity to report from overseas and advance their careers.

    In previous years, fellows have produced more than 174 stories, enriching their communities with new perspectives on global issues.

  • Call for Entries: The Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) in collaboration with ONE and the Elliott family seek entries for the inaugural 2017 Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling. Mike served as a distinguished editor at The Economist, Newsweek and Time before becoming CEO of ONE. Earlier this year, he had spoken of his dream to establish an award that would bring together his belief in great journalism with his commitment to progress in Africa.

  • Covering Road Safety in the Southeast Asia Region

    Meet the Fellows

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO), road-traffic injuries account for approximately 316,000 death each year in the Southeast Asia Region. Globally, these deaths make up 25% of all road-traffic fatalities.

    Photo courtesy of Yann, Wikimedia Commons

    In partnership with WHO, the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) will organize a two-day workshop from Dec. 5 – 6, 2016, for journalists from the Southeast Asia region to improve their coverage of this public-health and -safety issue.

  • Story contest winners highlight minority women entrepreneurs in the U.S.

    Minority women entrepreneurs are on the rise, and it’s about time. Women-owned businesses increased by 27% and minority-owned businesses increased by 38% between 2007 and 2012, according to 2012 U.S. Census Data.

  • Back In The Newsroom Fellowship 2015

    The six 2015 Back in the Newsroom fellows at ICFJ's office.

    Building on the success of the 2014 program, ICFJ will host a new round of Back in the Newsroom Fellowships in 2015. In its first year, the program placed five journalism professors from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in cutting-edge newsrooms for the summer. This gave the fellows first-hand exposure to the latest thinking on content creation and delivery – information and skills they are using to revise their curricula and teaching methods to help students get internships and jobs.

  • Russia-U.S. Young Media Professionals Program

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) invites young, English-speaking journalists from Russia’s regions to take part in the “Russia-U.S. Young Media Professionals Program.” Eleven journalists, who will be selected in competition, will come to the United States for a program from Feb. 9 to 27, 2015.

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) invites early-career, English-speaking journalists from Russia’s regions to take part in the “Russia-U.S.

  • Vietnam-U.S. Reporting Program: Marking Two Decades of U.S.-Vietnamese Relations

    Trung tâm báo chí quốc tế (ICFJ) đang tìm kiếm các ứng viên cho Chương trình Đưa tin Việt Nam - Hoa Kỳ. Chương trình này có một khóa học trực tuyến, tua tham quan học tập và tư vấn cá nhân để kỷ niệm 20 năm thiết lập quan hệ ngoại giao giữa Hoa Kỳ và Việt Nam.

    60 nhà báo Việt Nam đủ điều kiện sẽ được ICFJ lựa chọn để tham gia chương trình. Khóa học trực tuyến sẽ được tổ chức trong năm tuần, bắt đầu từ ngày 05 tháng Một năm 2015 và kết thúc vào ngày 06 tháng Hai năm 2015. Khóa học sẽ tập trung vào các vấn đề về song phương và toàn cầu.

  • Social Justice Reporting for a Global America: International Reporting Fellowship Program for U.S.-based Journalists

    This program is no longer active.

    About the Program

    Plagued by the twin challenges of a slow economy and digital disruption, many U.S. news organizations are cutting back on foreign coverage and are shrinking their editorial staffs.

    But journalists can play an essential role in raising awareness around international social justice issues, including women’s rights, corruption, human trafficking, poverty, religious tolerance, environmental issues, migration and education.

  • Social Justice Reporting for a Global America: International Reporting Fellowship Program for U.S.-based Journalists

    This program is no longer active.

    About the Program

    Plagued by the twin challenges of a slow economy and digital disruption, many U.S. news organizations are cutting back on foreign coverage and are shrinking their editorial staffs.

    But journalists can play an essential role in raising awareness around international social justice issues, including women’s rights, corruption, human trafficking, poverty, religious tolerance, environmental issues, migration and education.

  • Online Video-Storytelling Course for Indian Journalists and Journalism Students

    उन चुनिंदा भारतीय पत्रकारों और पत्रकारिता के छात्रों के समूह में शामिल हो जाइये जो प्रैक्टिकल और इंटरेक्टिव ऑनलाइन कोर्स “वीडियों स्टोरीटेलिंग” में भाग ले रहे हैं। इंटरनेशनल सेंटर फॉर जर्नलिस्ट (आईसीएफजे) के सहयोग से 9.9 स्कूल ऑफ कम्युनिकेशन द्वारा प्रस्तुत छह हफ्ते का यह सेमिनार 2 दिसंबर, 2013 से 10 जनवरी, 2013 के बीच संचालित होगा। इसके लिए चुने जाने वाले कैंडिडेट्स को पूर्ण स्कॉलरशिप हासिल होगी। सबसे अच्छे कैंडिडेट्स को ‘दि न्यूयॉर्क टाइम्स’ इंडिया इंक के वीडियो प्रदाता से एक हफ्ते की कोचिंग हासिल करने का मौका मिलेगा।

  • The Center for Excellence in Journalism (CEJ)

    Professional journalists participate in a short TV documentary production module at the CEJ in Karachi.

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), along with Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and the Institute of Business Administration (IBA), have established the Center for Excellence in Journalism (CEJ) in Karachi, Pakistan. The CEJ serves as a hub for the professional development, training and networking of Pakistani journalists and media professionals from all parts of the country. It also welcomes journalists from around the world to participate in its programs.

  • India: Enhance a Cutting-Edge, Multimedia Academy and Help Make it Sustainable

    Siddhartha Dubey is a Knight International Journalism Fellow who led the World Media Academy Delhi, the only journalism institute in India that teaches students to report across multiple platforms, with hand-on, practical training in print, TV, online video, audio/radio and social media.

  • South Africa: Create Multimedia Health Coverage

    In South Africa, where AIDS and tuberculosis continue to cripple the population, Knight Health Journalism Fellow Brenda Wilson expanded multimedia health coverage at the country’s largest broadcaster, the South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC). She dramatically increased coverage of health from its network of provincial bureaus.

  • Colombia: Use Crowd Sourcing Technology to Track Crime and Corruption

    Knight International Journalism Fellow Ronnie Lovler helped El Tiempo, Colombia’s largest newspaper, develop a website that uses citizen reports to map crime in the capital city of Bogota. Modeled after a similar Fellowship project in Panama, citizens and citizen journalists post information on the map. Lovler trained El Tiempo journalists to use the map to identify trends and produce investigative stories about crime and violence.

  • Ethiopia: Launch the Country's First Health Journalists' Association

    Elsabet Samuel Tadesse is a Knight Health Journalism Fellow who has led the creation of Ethiopia's first health journalists' association, the Addis Ababa Health Journalists' Initiative. She also launched a half-hour health show called “Tenachin” (Our Health) on Ethiopia’s national television network. The show, which airs every two weeks on the Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency (ERTA), educates the public on key topics such as tuberculosis, maternal health, HIV/AIDS, and health extension services.

  • Indonesia: Launch a Mobile Environmental News Service for Rural Communities

    Harry Surjadi recruited and trained more than 150 citizen journalists living in the most-remote areas of Borneo to send news reports via text messaging using the FrontlineSMS system to Ruai TV, a station in the provincial capital. The service also allows subscribers from mainstream media, the government, and activist organizations to receive the news reports.

  • Public Service Journalism for Arabic-speaking Journalists

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) held a six-week online course in Arabic on using digital tools in public service journalism and investigative techniques. The online course was the first part of a program that brought together journalists, citizen journalists and civil society actors from Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, West Bank/Gaza and Yemen. The six-week online course guided 60 participants from the above mentioned countries to work on ideas for multimedia public service journalism projects.

  • Unilever Journalism Exchange Program for Journalists from Ghana

    Samuel Kwaku Agyemang of Metropolitan Television (Metro TV) in Accra participated in the 2011 Unilever Journalism Exchange Program for journalists from Ghana. Agyemang was named the Best Journalist of the Year in Ghana in 2009.

  • Peru: Create the First Broadcast Training Center

    Hena Cuevas trained broadcast news reporters and producers in Peru to improve the quality of news reports and increase local news in national coverage. Her partner, the National Association of Local Television Channels (Red TV), is Peru’s largest network of local TV stations, an alliance of 40 independent channels that reaches more than a third of Peru’s TV viewers. She has created a two-person training team that is working with Red TV’s affiliates to improve everything from reporting standards to camera work.

  • Middle East: Start Up Investigative Reporting Teams at Major News Outlets

    At a pivotal time for the Middle East, Knight International Journalism Fellow Amr El-Kahky is launching teams of investigative reporters at news organizations across the region. His efforts have helped journalists gain more access to government documents than ever before, particularly in Jordan and the West Bank. His investigative unit in Jordan uncovered a vote-buying scheme ahead of the November 2010 parliamentary elections. Jordanian reporters also tackled the issue of childhood alcohol addiction—a controversial topic never covered in the past.

  • Haiti: Track Aid Funds to Ensure a Strong Recovery

    Haitian journalists work in a makeshift newsroom at Le Nouvelliste. Their old building was destroyed in the January 2010 earthquake.

    Knight International Journalism Fellow Klarreich established an investigative team at Le Nouvelliste, Haiti’s leading newspaper, which regularly produces stories on the misuse of aid sent to Haiti after the catastrophic January 2010 earthquake. The team broke stories about a land dispute that stopped work at a critically important sanitation plant near a refugee camp. After reading these reports, Haitian President Michel Joseph Martelly intervened and construction resumed.

  • Capacity Development of Media Institutions Leaders in Yemen

    ICFJ provided hands-on training and mentoring to Yemeni media managers in order to give them the knowledge and skills to run their newsrooms as professionally and effectively as possible. The program structure included three phases: a two-week media management course, three months of online mentoring, and a two-week in-person follow up consultancy.

  • Sierra Leone: Launch the First Public Broadcasting Service

    Stephen Douglas launched the country’s first media training center at the new Sierra Leone Broadcasting Corporation (SLBC), and served as its interim director. He coordinated all journalism and media management training funded by groups such as Deutsche Welle, Journalists for Human Rights, BBC World Service Trust and the United Nations. Courses range from media law and basic radio reporting to journalism ethics and TV camera operation.

  • Bangladesh: Creating the First Women’s Broadcast News Agency

    In a country where women have played a minor role in TV news, Kawser Mahmud has created the country’s first women’s broadcast news agency. The agency is giving women the skills they need to fill key positions in broadcast news at Bangladesh’s 10 newly licensed TV stations—and to produce stories on issues that may be of interest to women viewers.

    Mahmud trained nearly three dozen women as reporters, producers and camera operators at the Television News Agency (TVNA). Most have been scooped up by the new independent TV stations.

  • NewsU International launches course on journalism and trauma in Persian

    A new self-directed course aims to help Persian-language journalists who cover traumatic events.

    The Trauma and Journalism course in Persian, offered by NewsU International, a partnership partnership between the Poynter Institute and the International Center for Journalists, aims to equip journalists covering human tragedies and crises with better tools to protect themselves from psychological trauma.