ICFJ Programs in Social Issues

  • Crisis Reporting: Deeper, Broader, Better

    ICFJ administered a five-week Arabic online course on crisis reporting. The course, which took place April 15 to May 20, 2008, explored various topics, including natural disasters, humanitarian interventions and health crises.

  • Lebanon: New TV Programs Focus on Social Problems in Middle East

    Working with teams of broadcast journalists from major news networks in Jordan and Lebanon, Knight International created "Arab House," a series of news documentaries. The shows focused on social issues such as access to clean water and good health care. Knight Fellow Mariam Sami helped these journalists identify compelling topics and produce in-depth reports that were widely broadcast.

    HIGHLIGHTS

    • Four half-hour documentaries on the arts, education, health and the environment aired on local and satellite TV around the world.
  • Covering Immigration: Establishing Links Between U.S. and Latin American Media

    This training program on coverage of immigration brought together journalists from U.S. community-based Spanish- and English-language media and Latin American media for a hands-on training workshop on covering immigration issues, followed by several days of reporting on the issue under the guidance of experienced trainers. It took place in Washington, D.C., April 16-24.

  • International Journalism Exchange

    For decades, the International Center for Journalists’ International Journalism Exchange has brought experienced newspaper, broadcast or online editors from the developing world to the U.S. to observe how media are managed here.

  • Back In The Newsroom 2017

    ICFJ launched the Back in the Newsroom program in collaboration with the Gannett Foundation and Morgan State University’s School of Global Journalism and Communication. An incubator for young journalistic talent, the program aims to improve newsroom diversity through partnerships with historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

  • The use of digital tools in public service reporting

    The International Center for Journalists is offering an online course on the use of digital tools in public service reporting, which will be held from March 15 to April 25.

    The online course is the first part of a program that will bring together professional and citizen journalists with civil society actors from Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Morocco, West Bank/Gaza and Yemen. The six-week online course will guide 60 participants from these countries to work on ideas for multimedia public service journalism projects.

  • ICFJ offers online course on covering conflict for Egyptian journalists

    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) is offering a six-week online course on covering conflict: challenges, opportunities and best practices for Egyptian journalists. The course will be held from November 18, 2013, to December 29, 2013. The deadline to apply is November 8, 2013.

  • Mike O'Connor Scholarship for Mexican Journalists

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    The International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) invites Mexican journalists living in Mexico to apply for the Mike O’Connor Scholarship for Investigative Journalism. This scholarship, financed by the United States Embassy in Mexico, is dedicated to the memory of Mike O’Connor, American investigative journalist who worked tirelessly to protect Mexican journalists as part of his work for th

  • Beca Mike O’Connor de Periodismo de Investigación

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    El Centro Internacional para Periodistas (ICFJ) convoca a medios y periodistas mexicanos que residan en México a postularse para la Beca Mike O’Connor de Periodismo de Investigación.

    Esta beca, auspiciada por la Embajada de los Estados Unidos en México, es un homenaje a Mike O’Connor, periodista de investigación de origen estadounidense, que trabajó febrilmente para proteger a periodistas mexicanos como parte de su asignación p

  • Back In The Newsroom Fellowship 2014

    The Back In the Newsroom Fellowship will help journalism educators see firsthand the new skills needed for students to succeed in today’s newsrooms.

    Back In The Newsroom is a fellowship program that brings five professors from historically black colleges and universities to spend a summer working in digitally advanced U.S. news organizations. This “internship” will help journalism educators see firsthand the new skills needed for students to succeed in today’s newsrooms.

    The fellows will update their digital skills, develop cutting-edge curricula and strengthen relations between these newsrooms and their schools. The program will help improve diversity at leading U.S.

  • Community Health Reporting Fellowship

    We are no longer accepting applications for this fellowship.

    Overcoming barriers to care in underserved communities is one of the major challenges facing the United States health care system today. Journalists can play an essential role in leveling the playing field by covering the critical health issues that most affect these communities.

    The Community Health Reporting Fellowship gives U.S.

  • Roadblocks Along the New Silk Road

    Journalists from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the Maldives were invited to apply to a program that aimed to connect 21-30 year old journalists in South Asia for joint reporting projects that explored topics relating to migration and issues affecting women and young people in the region, while also training the journalists on investigative journalism and responsible reporting in the digital age. The program, run by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, had two phases.

  • South Asia’s Youth at Risk – Multimedia Storytelling by Young Journalists

    Participants in the 2012 "Best Practices in the Digital Age for South Asian Journalists" Program interview a farmer in Sri Lanka using an iPod Touch.

    Journalists from Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and the Maldives were invited to apply to a program that aims to connect 21-30 year old journalists in South Asia for joint reporting projects that explore topics relating to youth and the risks young people face in the region, while also training the journalists on responsible reporting in the digital age. The program, run by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S.