Covering Road Safety in the Southeast Asia Region


Meet the Fellows

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), road-traffic injuries account for approximately 316,000 death each year in the Southeast Asia Region. Globally, these deaths make up 25% of all road-traffic fatalities.

Photo courtesy of Yann, Wikimedia Commons

In partnership with WHO, the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) will organize a two-day workshop from Dec. 5 – 6, 2016, for journalists from the Southeast Asia region to improve their coverage of this public-health and -safety issue. ICFJ will select 15 journalists from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Indonesia, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, the Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Timor-Leste to attend the session. The workshop’s location in Southeast Asia will be announced in the near future.

The training will improve the participants' understanding of road-safety issues and provide them with cutting-edge digital tools to create in-depth, engaging coverage. Fellows will have the chance to work with high-level technical experts in the field of road safety and receive guidance and mentoring on reporting projects. During the workshop, fellows will learn basic facts about road safety, the difference between reporting on traffic and road safety, and how to identify and scrape data, create data-driven reports and develop data visualizations to engage audiences. Fellows also will learn about best practices when utilizing social media.

The workshop will include detailed discussions on road-safety facts, evidence and best practices, including an overview of local and regional policies. The goal of the program is to raise awareness among journalists of road-traffic injuries as a leading cause of death in the region and to help increase coverage of this under-reported issue.

WHO/ICFJ will cover all fellowship-related costs including travel to the workshop and accommodations. Journalists who apply for the fellowship must be fluent in English. Applicants must currently work and reside in one of the 11 WHO Southeast Asia Region member states. Applicants should provide the following materials:

• An essay (no more than 500 words) detailing the motivation and goals for attending the workshop, which includes three specific changes you hope to make in how you work as a result of the program;

• A detailed road safety reporting project that may focus on your own country or the region and that incorporates digital tools and/or data, as well as ways to use these tools and social media to engage audiences in a dialogue about road-safety issues;

• A commitment to produce at least three road-safety stories as a result of the workshop;

• A letter of support from an editor or newsroom manager endorsing your participation in the program and demonstrating support for publishing, posting and/or broadcasting your story project;

• A resume or curriculum vitae;

• At least two samples of your work that has focused on road safety, published/posted/broadcast recently (no earlier than 2015).

Selection will be based on the journalists’ professional qualifications, relevant experience such as demonstrated interest in the topic of road safety, English-language proficiency, and endorsement by a newsroom manager.

Useful links:
World Health Organization guide: Reporting on Road Safety
World Health Organization report on Road Safety in the South-East Asia Region, 2015

This initiative is part of the media capacity development component of the current Bloomberg Initiative for Global Road Safety (BIGRS) 2015-2019

If you have questions, please contact ICFJ's Cassandra Balfour, cbalfour@icfj.org.