Brazil

Brazil: Launch a Digital Map That Uses Open Data to Monitor the Amazon

Gustavo Faleiros is a Knight International Journalism Fellow based in Brazil who has created a comprehensive online map that makes extensive use of data to track the deteriorating environment of the nine-country Amazon region. The map—a mash-up of existing technologies such as satellite images, open data and media and social-media feeds—is hosted by partner O Eco, an environmental news site, and supported by a grant from Internews.

Nov 212011

Brazil’s Largest Daily Expands Multimedia Blog for Underserved Communities

As a Knight International Journalism Fellow in Brazil, Bruno Garcez launched the Mural multimedia blog for citizens in Sao Paulo’s poor neighborhoods. Now hosted and supported by the country’s largest daily newspaper, the blog is thriving… and the number of citizen-journalist bloggers is growing.

Jan 102011

Creating a Journalism Community in Brazil

Early in 2010, I bumped totally by chance on the streets of São Paulo into a good friend of mine, Alexandre Maron, an editor of New Projects at the Globo magazine group. I told him then that I was in Brazil as a Knight International Journalism Fellow, with the International Center for Journalists.

Brazilian Blog Gets An Impressive New Home

Bruno pictured with one of the first groups of students trained in Mural workshops. (Photo: Eduardo Anizelli/Folhapress)

Brazilian Blog Gets An Impressive New Home

Bruno pictured with one of the first groups of students trained in Mural workshops. (Photo: Eduardo Anizelli/Folhapress)

Nov 242010

Brazilian Blog Gets An Impressive New Home

Editors Note: A web address change for Mural, a leading citizen journalist blog in São Paulo.

Mural, the blog that comprises news stories and videos by more than 50 volunteer bloggers and citizen journalists, is moving today to a new address.

Nov 22010

Election of Brazil’s First Female President Offers Lessons for Reporters

The election of Brazil’s first woman president should be hailed, but has not aroused many celebrations. A dirty campaign in which the media has a lot to answer for has much to do with that.

This Sunday, for the first time in its history, Brazil elected a woman to the country’s highest political office. Even for those with differing political views, this should have been hailed as an historic milestone in a nation with a male-dominated workforce. And yet, many people, weary of an incredibly negative, shallow campaign season, were just eager for it all to end.

Election of Brazil’s First Female President Offers Lessons for Reporters

Rouseff was elected to become Brazil’s first female president on Sunday, October 31. (Photo by Isaac Ribeiro)

Brazil: Journalism Training (2001)

Knight International Journalism Fellow Stephen Coon completed four months in Brazil in 2001, partnering with the Sindicato dos Jornalistas Profissionais do Amazonas.