Participant Story

February
24
2020

Tiananmen at 30: You Can ‘Hear the Echoes of it if You Listen Closely Enough’

By

Philip J. Cunningham received a grant for immersive storytelling from Microsoft News and the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), but really, his whole life has been an immersive story.

February
24
2020

Nigerian Journalists Document Impacts of Oil Contamination

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From the late 1950s, when oil exploration and production began in the Niger Delta, until it was suspended in the early 1990s, millions of barrels of oil were spilled, contaminating the land and water in a region of Nigeria known as Ogoniland, inhabited by the Ogoni people. They are among the oldest settlers in the area, which today is home to 850,000 people, many of whom rely on farming and fishing to make a living.

February
24
2020

Learning How Climate Change Affects Everyday Life

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Josh Landis lived and worked in Antarctica from 1999 to 2001 as an editor at The Antarctic Sun, the only newspaper on the continent at that time. And while he was hardly the only person on the continent, it could often feel like that in a peaceful sort of way.

February
24
2020

News Reporting Grantee Winner: ‘I’ve Developed Other Skills That Make Me a 21st Century Journalist’

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Verah Okeyo will never forget the sight of three women sharing one hospital bed; Josh Landis, the ravages of climate change-driven storms on coastal communities; Phil Cunningham, the haunted feeling of Tiananmen Square; and Ruth Olurounbi and Kelechukwu Iruoma, the frustration over cleanup delays of oil spills from decades ago.

February
24
2020

Using the Power of Data to Improve Children’s Health

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Verah Okeyo’s father earned about $30 a month as a supervisor at a flower farm near Lake Naivasha in Kenya. Her mother was a midwife whose work included educating expectant and new mothers about health and sanitation. The family were provided their own house. The flower farm’s owners made sure Verah and her three siblings were provided with education and healthcare.

February
20
2020

Local Newsrooms Must Watch Out for False Claims, Fake Photos This U.S. Election Season

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As the U.S. election season gears up, journalists at local news organizations should prepare for an onslaught of misinformation aimed at distorting polling results, says ICFJ TruthBuzz Fellow and fact-checking expert Matt Riley.

August
25
2019

Indonesian survey explores the spread of misinformation on WhatsApp

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Misinformation is more common than ever in Indonesia today as its spread has become increasingly diversified and difficult to suppress. In April alone, when the country held its general election, Indonesia’s Ministry of Communication and Information Technology identified 486 pieces of misinformation shared across several online platforms — 209 of them politically-related. The ministry noted that this number surged leading up to the April 17 election, and has only continued to increase after. 

April
10
2019

To Reach a Wider Audience, Expand Fact-Checking to Broadcast News

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Fact-checkers don’t just have a misinformation problem. They also have an audience engagement problem.

February
26
2016

What Today's Newsrooms Can do to Spark Innovation For Tomorrow

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Back in September, I partnered with The Express Tribune, a leading English-language newspaper in Karachi, Pakistan, as part of my ICFJ Knight Fellowship to work on news innovation. The main focus was working with the Tribune Labs team and helping them build up their capacity in order to work on visual and interactive content on their own, without the need for a developer.

To start off, we brought a developer on board as an Innovation Fellow. Our first task was to help Labs with a system where they could develop interactive features on their own and in the shortest possible time.

June
7
2014

ICFJ Knight Fellow's Regional Hackathon Follows Funds

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Fourteen distinct chapters of Hacks/Hackers across Latin America and Miami gathered participants on June 7 to work on projects that attempt to answer one basic question: Where does my money go?

The hackathon brought journalists and coders together to follow where and how Latin American governments and corporations direct their funds.