“Back in the Newsroom” Fellowships Open to J-School Profs at Colleges for Minorities

|

All five professors who participated in the 2014 fellowship program implemented concrete changes in their classrooms, grooming students to work across all media platforms.

Building on last year’s success, the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) is hosting a new round of Back in the Newsroom Fellowships this summer. The program places journalism faculty from colleges and universities with large minority student populations in digitally savvy newsrooms for a summer.

The fellowships are designed to address the mismatch between the needs of media companies and the curriculum and teaching techniques in journalism departments at these universities.

The fellowships start on May 27, 2015 in Washington, D.C., with a two-day orientation. The professors will then spend nine weeks in their host newsrooms, where they will focus on multimedia and multiplatform reporting, data journalism, social media and other ways media organizations engage audiences.

The fellows return to Washington on July 30-31 to share ideas on how they will upgrade their curriculum and apply what they learned during the program at their universities.

In 2014, five journalism professors from historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) spent the summer at The Los Angeles Times, CNBC, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post.

The professors’ experiences led them to change their teaching methods and syllabi. All five implemented concrete changes in their classrooms, grooming students to work across all media platforms. The contacts forged during their fellowships helped create a pipeline for students to work as interns or find jobs at these major news outlets.

The deadline for this year’s Back in the Newsroom Fellowships program is April 20, 2015.

The Back in the Newsroom Fellowships program is funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

Latest News

Holding Beijing to Account for COVID-19 Will Not Get Easier, Hong Kong Reporter Says

Reporting from China has long been a challenge, but with the country at the epicenter of a global pandemic, information control and censorship appear to be on the rise, said South China Morning Post reporter Linda Lew.

Parlez-Vous Français? IJNet Launches New Channel in French

Since the pandemic, we have rapidly expanded our International Journalists’ Network (IJNet.org) at a time when reporters need it most. IJNet has long been the go-to site for journalists across the world to find useful tips, tools and opportunities. Now, more than ever, it has stepped up in a big way to serve journalists during the COVID-19 crisis. 

Key Quotes: How to Ask the Hard Questions When Covering COVID-19

“Every interview—whether it’s with a victim of COVID-19 or the president of your country—is a fight for control,” said Julian Sher, a veteran TV documentary writer and director, during an ICFJ webinar Tuesday.