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U.S.-Austrian Journalism Exchange Fellowships

The U.S.-Austrian Journalism Exchange Fellowships fosters greater understanding and knowledge of both countries among future media leaders and their audiences by helping them overcome historical stereotypes and political misperceptions.

The Douglas Tweedale Memorial Fellowship

The Douglas Tweedale Memorial Fellowship helps Latin American journalists improve their investigative reporting skills, either generally, or in a specialty reporting area such as immigration, environment, science and technology or business, through a three-week long program in the United States.

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U.S. Media Immersion Program for Central Asian Broadcast Journalists

Broadcast media professionals from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan are invited to apply for one of two programs this summer aimed at sharpening their broadcast journalism skills and immersing participants in cutting-edge digital journalism in the United States.

For one program, ICFJ will select six English-speaking broadcast journalists for a four-week fellowship. The program will start in Washington, D.C., with an intensive orientation that will expose participants to U.S.

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Training in Local Languages Will Help South Indian Journalists Use Social Media

Vernacular journalists and bloggers often are at a disadvantage as news outlets around the world increasingly rely on social media and digital tools to engage audiences. They may lack the language and skills needed to meet the demands of an online newsroom. <p/> To help address this technology and information gap, the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) is creating a cutting-edge curriculum that will help media professionals and journalism educators learn to use social media to connect with audiences in three South Indian states.

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Illuminating Today’s Japan for American Audiences

A program, organized by ICFJ and funded by the United States-Japan Foundation, sent three U.S. journalists to Japan for 12-day reporting tours with the goal of shedding light on the relationship between the two nations and the aftermath of the disasters in March 2011. The participating journalists traveled in Japan for 12 days with an experienced Japanese journalist and interpreter, and were expected to dig into the economic, social, environmental and energy-policy challenges still facing Japan after the 2011 earthquake, tsunami and meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

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New Media, New Challenges: Best Practices In the Digital Age

Journalists from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka were invited to apply to a training program aiming to connect journalists in the region on joint reporting projects that explored cross-border issues of importance, while also training them in responsible practices in the digital age. The program, ran by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) and sponsored by the U.S. State Department, had two main components.